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Blacksmithing - Forging my first 3lb rounding hammer

This video shows how I forge my first serious rounding hammer, using techniques inspired by the work of blacksmith Brian Brazeal.

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    Vallbona de les monges (VI)

    Listen Blacksmith - Loreena McKennitt A blacksmith courted me Nine months and better He fairly won my heart Wrote me a letter With his hammer in his hand He looked quite clever And if I was with my love I'd live...

    Photo by Jose Luis Mieza Photography on Flickr

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    Blacksmith Hammering

    Blacksmith hammering metal into a knife blade. Taken at the Whiskey Row shootout re-enactment in Prescott, Az.

    Photo by dagnyg on Flickr

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    Blacksmith Hammers

    Photo by calilily on Flickr

  • This RSS maintain URL is deprecated

    12/22/17

  • Blacksmith shapes bolt with skills honed in Germany

    12/20/17

    “My dad had his own blacksmith research, he was a master in that little town,” Hornsteiner said. “As soon as I could pick up a hammer he had me working.” Hornsteiner went on to do the years of school necessary to become a master blacksmith in Germany

  • Innocent blacksmith forges Roanoke career

    12/13/17

    Sparks sprayed as the 100-lambaste hammer repeatedly pounded the metal. After a few cycles of returning the bar to the propane forge, then returning it to the hammer for further pounding, it started to be like the object he had in mind: a piece of a

  • Barnstable Blacksmith Holds Unfaltering to an Ancient Craft

    12/11/17

    Norah Bourbon fashions a leaf lavaliere with hammer and anvil in her shop in Barnstable. Credit Photos by Sam Kimball. September 2017. In a smoky peach on in Barnstable, Norah Bourbon is doing her best to hold on to the ancient craft of blacksmithing in its

  • Steep-Quality, Hand-Forged Homestead Tools

    12/21/17

    A century after Will Dobkins' large-grandfather sharpened his first plowshare, forgoing low quality for master craftsmanship, Dobkins continues to give rise to top-notch tools in that same spirit, using a blend of old and new techniques to craft, repair

Blacksmith shapes rush with skills honed in Germany - Daily Inter Lake

A lurch to Rebel Mountain Forge near Trego is long no matter where you begin, but owner Andreas Hornsteiners cavort will always be the longest.

A native of Mittenwald, Germany, Hornsteiner spent almost a decade attractive a master blacksmith in his native country before immigrating to the United States.

My dad had his own blacksmith shop, he was a chief in that little town, Hornsteiner said. As soon as I could pick up a hammer he had me working.

Hornsteiner went on to achieve the years of school necessary to become a master blacksmith in Germany. He said over there the clientele entails a lot more than just working in a forge, but includes a lot of construction techniques and welding and profuse skills necessary to be a highly skilled tradesman.

Those skills have come in handy in Hornsteiners 47 years, but now he is getting back to his old roots and producing artistic tools with practical uses and selling them at crafts fairs across the ceremonial as he gets his new business, Rebel Mountain Forge, off the ground.

Over here in the United States being a blacksmith is just forging, but over there it has a everything other meaning, Hornsteiner said.

In the early 1990s Hornsteiner first came to the U.S. with his get, who always had a dream of being a blacksmith in America. The family lived in Arizona for a year before heading back to Germany. Hornsteiner came back the next year and began racing motocross bikes, and has been mostly been working in the U.S. in divers trades since then.

He spent time running a concrete-pouring business in Florida before he at the end of the day found himself in Montana. For years he ran a similar concrete business in Eureka. Finally, he found a fix of property at the end of a remote road near a remote town in a remote corner of a outside state. There, he has taken pieces of his fathers influence and his own experiences and used them each to invent a new life.

When he bought his land outside Trego about 12 years ago, there was only one humble, under-insulated home. He said he almost froze to death his first winter out there. The next year he insulated and added windows, and every year since then he has made improvements.

Hes fatigued to his patch of land by qualities many Montanans unite behind.

I like the hunting and the fishing and the horses and the mountains and the scope, Hornsteiner said.

Now, he has a shop with a forge inside that he built himself. Up on a hill he built a larger new log national where he lives in with his partner, Kelsey Hooper. The home has panoramic views of the circumambient mountain ranges, and operates off the grid except for a telephone land-spiel and satellite internet.

Hes drilled a well, built several wood-heated fireplaces, decorated the to the quick with hides from animals he mostly shot himself, and filled it with gorgeous hand-wrought art that he fashions down the hill and now sells at crafts fairs across the testify.

In the last year, Hornsteiner has quit the concrete business and began pouring verve into selling his forged wares. A generator powers the lights and radio in the betray, and while it runs it charges batteries up at the house that Hornsteiner and Hooper use for the trace amounts of fervency they use each evening for running the lights and a small television.

Living off the grid isnt as homely as everyone thinks it is, Hornsteiner said. People think that living off the grid means that you have no bills. Survival still goes on. You still have bills, you still need a job.

He said the biggest challenge in the whole venture is conclusion and paying for materials. Despite his labor being highly skilled, it only factors into a trifling portion of the final costs of his products.

He runs his forge with coal, and the coal mined in Montana is too easygoing for that type of work. He had to make a trip to Alabama and order 10 tons of coal, which he said sell for tens of thousands of dollars to ship back up to where he needed it in Trego.

He gets his dagger from Pacific Steel in Kalispell, and he said there are a lot of projects he would like to do, but having a heavy stock of steel just laying around is prohibitively expensive. Many of the engender benches he has in his shop he fashioned from found materials. He said he would like to build railings far his new log home, but the steel alone would cost thousands of dollars that he cant contribute right away.

Hornsteiner said he works as a blacksmith mainly to earn a living, but it rings with the same irony as people who say survive in the backcountry because they say it is a simple life.

One doesnt have to look far to see the immense amount of flower with which Hornsteiner hones his craft. In one corner of his shop, he has the same anvil his father Euphemistic pre-owned growing up. He had it shipped to the United States so he could carry on the family tradition, and uses it with every play he makes.

Ill make it, I have no doubt about it, Hornsteiner said.

Right now he makes a medley of household products, from wine holders and toilet-paper rods to steak flippers and knives fashioned from railroad spikes he found on his realty after he moved out there. He also has dinner bells, mirrors trimmed with ornate steel roses and fireplace appliance sets.

He hopes to get his name recognition developed to a point that he can make larger-scope projects such as curtain rods and hand rails for stairs, for high-end following.

Hornsteiner sold his products at the Kalispell and Columbia Falls farmers markets final summer and went to the Made in Montana trade show in Helena and the craft good-looking at the Adams Center in Missoula last year, too.

He hopes to add the Whitefish Farmers Call to the rotation this summer. His products can also be found and purchased on his website at rebelmountainforge.com, and he also has a Facebook paginate.

Reporter Peregrine Frissell can be reached at 406-758-4438 or pfrissell@dailyinterlake.com.

Source: www.dailyinterlake.com
Now she knows how to swing a blacksmith's hammer and how to kiss a girl three feet shorter than you. 10/25/16,
RT @Heartspadeforge: Take a break from #thewalkingdead and look what a real hammer can do! #blacksmith #ironwork #WalkingDeadFamily #walkin… 10/24/16,
  • The Blacksmith's Hammer Or the Peasant Code

    Createspace Independent Publishing Platform. 2016. ISBN: 1532771010,9781532771019. 254 pages.

    Notice: This Book is published by Historical Books Limited (www.publicdomain.org.uk) as a Public Domain Book, if you have any inquiries, requests or need any help you can just send an email to publications@publicdomain.org.uk This book is found as a public domain and free book based on various online catalogs, if you think there are any problems regard copyright issues please contact us immediately via DMCA@publicdomain.org.uk

  • The Mysteries of the People: The blacksmith's hammer

    2016.
  • Southwestern Colonial Ironwork

    Sunstone Press. 2008. ISBN: 0865346011,9780865346017. 199 pages.

    Colonial blacksmiths were more common in the Southwest and their work more sophisticated than has generally been recognized. They forged all manner of domestic utensils and hardware and served as gunsmiths, armorers and farriers. This book is the first historical and practical survey of the full range of ornamental and utilitarian ironwork used and made by Spanish people in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas from the 1500s to about 1850, and is one of the most complete pictures of any...

  • The Home Blacksmith

    Lumina Media. 2016. ISBN: 9781620082133,1620082136. 224 pages.
  • Three Homelands

    Syracuse University Press. 2016. ISBN: 0815607342,9780815607342. 345 pages.

    Compelling recollections of a Jewish boy in a prewar Polish village, of his incredible scramble to survive the Holocaust, and of his adventures in America. Told with the inimitable flair of a born storyteller, these stories recall the lost world of small-town Polish Jewry before the Holocaust and the subsequent odyssey of one boy's struggle to stay alive in the face of catastrophe. Brimming with the authenticity and humanity of personal experience, these memoirs are at once persuasive,...

  • Colonial Williamburg blacksmiths carry the hammer

    10/26/16

    James Anderson's Blacksmith Shop in Colonial Williamsburg is a world of activity. With forges fired up, hammers hit away at metal, hand-held files grind down fine detail work and sunlight seeps through windows to reveal smoke and metal particles floating ...

  • Oldest pub in Ancoats torn down for apartments development

    10/25/16

    It only became a pub in 1827. As a pub it was previously known as The Blacksmiths Arms, and was also known affectionately as The Hammer after a local football team. It underwent another name change, becoming the Hammer in Hand, when it was a Taylor’s ...

  • Forged in fire: Inside blacksmiths’ world where creativity meets mystery

    10/25/16

    The art of blacksmithing is not an easy one nor is it a task for the lazy man. It is a continuous battle between the anvil, the metal, fire and the hammer. The battle is a continuous one that is not only fierce but seemingly endless and it is one coupled ...